Rambling about books

Book review: The Language of Thorns, by Leigh Bardugo

Book cover from Goodreads

Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Title: The Language of Thorns

Author: Leigh Bardugo

Genre: Fantasy, Fiction, Short Stories, Young Adult

Goodreads link

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Rambling about books

Book review: The Garden of Three Hundred Flowers, by E. K. Johnston

Book cover from Goodreads

Rating: ⭐️⭐️☆☆☆

Title: The Garden of Three Hundred Flowers (A Thousand Nights #1.5)

Author: E. K. Johnston

Genre: Fantasy, Fiction, Retellings, Short Stories, Young Adult

Goodreads link

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Rambling about books

Book review: The Accusation: Forbidden Stories from Inside North Korea, by Bandi

Book cover from Goodreads

Fifty Years in this northern land

Living as a machine that speaks

Living as a human under a yoke

Without talent

With a pure indignation

Written not with pen and ink

But with bones drenched with blood and tears

Is this writing of mine

Though they be dry as a desert

And rough as a grassland

Shabby as an invalid

Reader!

I beg you to read my words.

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Rambling about books

2017 Book Awards

I’ve always wanted to do book awards since the first time I had this blog, but, see, I’m a creature of habit; I always go back to the same genre over and over again. And when you only read either, fictions, non-fictions, historical fictions, young adults, and contemporaries, let’s just say it’s not entirely easy to make your own book awards.

Well, that is until I realise, I can make my own categories and gave out my own awards to the books I’ve read however I like it. Here are the categories that I have come up with.

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Rambling about books

Boo! 👻

Is it cliche to be writing about scary book in October? You know, what with Halloween and whatnots? Probably it is indeed cliche, but will it stop me from actually writing one? Definitely not.

I had my fair share of scary books, from one that is mildly scary to ones that actually became the fruit of my nightmare.

But, are all scary books always ghost related? Not according to me. Anything that cause me to put the book down is definitely a scary book. So, without further ado and in no particular order, let us all pee in our pants over these scary books that I’ve read.

A/N: I can’t promise you this will be spoiler free, so read at your own risk (but I’ll try my best not to spoil everything) and the level of scariness is measured by the number of the screaming emoji with one being the least and five being the most.

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Rambling about books

Book review: xo Orpheus: Fifty New Myths

Fifty leading writers retell myths from around the world in this dazzling follow-up to the bestselling My Mother She Killed Me, My Father He Ate Me.

Icarus flies once more. Aztec jaguar gods again stalk the earth. An American soldier designs a new kind of Trojan horse—his cremains in a bullet. Here, in beguiling guise, are your favorite mythological figures alongside characters from Indian, Punjabi, Inuit, and other traditions.

Aimee Bender retells the myth of the Titans.
Elizabeth McCracken retells the myth of Lamia, the child-eating mistress of Zeus.
Madeline Miller retells the myth of Galatea.
Kevin Wilson retells the myth of Phaeton, from Ovid’s Metamorphoses.
Emma Straub and Peter Straub retell the myth of Persephone.
Heidi Julavits retells the myth of Orpheus and Euridice.
Ron Currie, Jr. retells the myth of Dedalus.
Maile Meloy retells the myth of Demeter.
Zachary Mason retells the myth of Narcissus.
Joy Williams retells the myth of Argos, Odysseus’ dog.

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Rambling about books

Book review: The Tsar of Love and Techno, by Anthony Marra

This stunning, exquisitely written collection introduces a cast of remarkable characters whose lives intersect in ways both life-affirming and heartbreaking. A 1930s Soviet censor painstakingly corrects offending photographs, deep underneath Leningrad, bewitched by the image of a disgraced prima ballerina. A chorus of women recount their stories and those of their grandmothers, former gulag prisoners who settled their Siberian mining town. Two pairs of brothers share a fierce, protective love. Young men across the former USSR face violence at home and in the military. And great sacrifices are made in the name of an oil landscape unremarkable except for the almost incomprehensibly peaceful past it depicts. In stunning prose, with rich character portraits and a sense of history reverberating into the present, The Tsar of Love and Techno is a captivating work from one of our greatest new talents. Goodreads

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