Book review: His Bloody Project, by Graeme Macrae Burnet

It is not enough for you to think that no man could commit such heinous acts and be deemed to be of sound mind. Sane men can and do commit such crimes, and the mere fact of committing such an act does not, in itself, place an individual outside the boundaries of reason.

 

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2017 Book Awards

I’ve always wanted to do book awards since the first time I had this blog, but, see, I’m a creature of habit; I always go back to the same genre over and over again. And when you only read either, fictions, non-fictions, historical fictions, young adults, and contemporaries, let’s just say it’s not entirely easy to make your own book awards.

Well, that is until I realise, I can make my own categories and gave out my own awards to the books I’ve read however I like it. Here are the categories that I have come up with.

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Book review: Pretty Girls, by Karin Slaughter

The world stops for you when you’re pretty. That’s why women spend billions of crap for their faces. Their whole life, they’re the center of attention. People want to be around them just because they’re attractive. Their jokes are funnier. Their lives are better. And then suddenly, they get bags under their eyes or they put on a little weight and no one cares about them anymore. They cease to exist.

 

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Boo! 👻

Is it cliche to be writing about scary book in October? You know, what with Halloween and whatnots? Probably it is indeed cliche, but will it stop me from actually writing one? Definitely not.

I had my fair share of scary books, from one that is mildly scary to ones that actually became the fruit of my nightmare.

But, are all scary books always ghost related? Not according to me. Anything that cause me to put the book down is definitely a scary book. So, without further ado and in no particular order, let us all pee in our pants over these scary books that I’ve read.

A/N: I can’t promise you this will be spoiler free, so read at your own risk (but I’ll try my best not to spoil everything) and the level of scariness is measured by the number of the screaming emoji with one being the least and five being the most.

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Book review: Fatherland, by Robert Harris

It is April 1964 and one week before Hitler’s 75th birthday. Xavier March, a detective of the Kriminalpolizei, is called out to investigate the discovery of a dead body in a lake near Berlin’s most prestigious suburb. As March discovers the identity of the body, he uncovers signs of a conspiracy that could go to the very top of the German Reich. And, with the Gestapo just one step behind, March, together with an American journalist, is caught up in a race to discover and reveal the truth – a truth that has already killed, a truth that could topple governments, a truth that will change history. Goodreads.

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Book review: Touch, by Claire North

This was the book that I should have read before The Sudden Appearance of Hope, but by some wrong calculation, I end up reading this after the said book. On hindsight, it was actually a favourable mistake; whilst I do enjoy The Sudden Appearance of Hope, I have to say that it still doesn’t hold a candle against The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August, while this one right here do come quite close on par. No, seriously, this book is so good! Everything about it is amazing! I have no complaint whatsoever.

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